Results 1 to 6 of 6
  • Thread: Vader Claerhout (6 Posts)
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Angry Vader Claerhout

    Please Be Careful With A Person Selling Art By The Bame Of Paranovalty, He Is The Brother Of A Mrs. Rosa Jonker, That Was Linked To Vader And Had A Case Of Forgery Against Her.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eastern Cape
    Posts
    10,639
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Admin - could we hear from you about this posting, please? Many thanks
    Yesterday I was clever and wanted to change the world.
    Today I am wise and am changing myself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Sasolburg, South Africa
    Posts
    5,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Hi Manto123,

    You are aware that user Paranovalty can sue you for slander with that comment even IF his sister had a case of forgery against her ? And IF she was found guilty of forgery it does not mean that he is following the same route.
    bidorbuy Forum Administrator



    bidorbuy.co.za - Africa's largest market place.
    bidorbuy on Facebook ~ What's hot on bidorbuy

    < TAKE THE TIME TO GIVE US A GOOD RATING

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    71
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Claerhout Fraud

    It strikes me as odd, the amount of Claerhout paintings that have popped up for sale in recent times. Not only on Bid or Buy but the wider art market in general. That forgeries are being made is a fact:What does one do to avoid a forgery? Here are a few things to consider:

    Price.

    Is the painting too cheap? Forgers are greedy and will seldom market a painting at or near its true value. They will offer big discounts that an honest art dealer who had to buy the artwork for resale just cannot compete with. Forgers after all don't mind selling at reduced rates because they have an unlimited supply!

    Availability.


    Are there just too many? When an artist dies the production of his works is meant to come to an end. You will then find some owners who wish to cash in on their investment at the new prices, and there will usually be an initial run on buying and selling a deceased artist's work. This flurry of activity usually quietens down, prices stabilise and pieces will from time to time appear on the market. If however, years after an artists death, a whole collection of new works appears on the market, this must be questioned.

    Context.


    Can the painting be associated with a distinct phase in the artists life, and thereby be dated accordingly? Can the seller of the painting tell you where and when he bought the painting and who owned it before that. If one follows this process of enquiry, one ought to end up back at the artist usually with an art dealer or other private owner along the way. If a seller claims to have bought a huge collection of paintings direct from the artist, and has been keeping them for years as an investment, then the chances are good that his claim can be authenticated by supplying dates, names of people he met while putting the deal together (Few artists are hermits, usually they have many people about that can verify a large deal was in fact done) and possibly even proof of payment. In Claerhout's later years, because of the forging of his works, he would often have a photograph of himself taken with the painting (Larger works mainly) to authenticate the work.

    Signs of aging.


    Even a painting that is just a year or two old has signs of aging. Paintings are handled, framed and re-framed and bear the scars, however small, of these processes. If a painting looks like it just came off the easel, it probably did.

    Question the Authenticity.

    If as a buyer you are going to spend money on someone else's product, it is your right to ask for a degree of authentication. The more money you are spending the better the efforts made to verify authenticity ought to be.

    Greed and Common Sense.


    I have already made reference to the greed of the forger, but the greatest ally in his nefarious activity is the greed of the buyer. Often people will go to great lengths to convince themselves that a painting which they are buying is genuine, just so that they can achieve a work by that artist at an absolute bargain. Use common sense to combat this tendency.

    The advice that I have given here is purely a service to any prospective buyer, in this case specifically of Claerhout paintings. The opinions I have expressed here are in no way aimed at any particular dealer.

    Any questions:
    Last edited by admin; 25-04-10 at 19:44. Reason: Removed contact details

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    71
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Manto123 View Post
    Please Be Careful With A Person Selling Art By The Bame Of Paranovalty, He Is The Brother Of A Mrs. Rosa Jonker, That Was Linked To Vader And Had A Case Of Forgery Against Her.
    <img id="img1" height="0" width="0">
    Forgery bombshell

    2002-05-05 19:47





    Johannesburg - Hundreds of artworks by world-renowned artist Father Frans Claerhout will soon be worth virtually nothing. In a frank interview, the Belgian painter of Tweespruit in the Free State admitted that a trusted friend has been falsifying his art for years.
    The forgeries, which have apparently been in circulation for three years, will be a blow to Claerhout collectors. The humanitarian artist, who has been painting since 1953, leads a solitary life at a Roman Catholic convent outside Tweespruit. He gives most of his money to the church.
    Claerhout was visibly sad when he talked about the falsifying of his paintings. He admitted for the first time that Rosa Jonker, a middle aged Bloemfontein businesswoman, was behind the falsification of some of his paintings. She had been like a daughter to him over the past 45 years, he said.
    Confessed
    "Rosa came to me to confess. She wanted to shoot herself. This has been going on for years. Hundreds of my works have been falsified."
    Claerhout (83) says the fraud is not limited to Jonker and Bloemfontein. He knows of at least three other places in the country, including Jeffreysbay in the Eastern Cape, where his paintings and sketches are being falsified.
    A tired Claerhout, whiskey in hand, says he doesn't know why he has kept quiet about the scam for so long.
    West Rand police have since launched a hunt for the false Claerhouts. Detectives recently went to Tweespruit to discuss the case with Claerhout personally.
    Father Michael Bissonnette, an old friend and colleague of Claerhout who also lives at the convent, said several artworks have been pointed out to the police that are definitely not originals. "Among the works there is a total falsification and one sketch that has been coloured by someone else."
    Bissonette says a sculpture of a donkey signed by Claerhout, is also not his handiwork. "I told father Claerhout not to sign it. It's not his work. It was done by some black men in the area."
    Claerhout initially said the donkey sculpture was "Rosa's project" and that he wanted nothing to do with it. On Saturday, he said that the donkey sculpture was indeed his own work.
    Bissonette said Claerhout was being used by people "to do things" that are not completely honest. "He is too good a person. He can't say no. Jonker is one of the people using father Claerhout for her own selfish reasons." Jonker recently released a statement to all dealers in which Claerhout vouches that all the Claerhouts sold by her (Jonker), are authentic. It is now evident that this is not the truth.
    'Must come to an end'
    "Father Claerhout will never refuse to draw something for friends or family. Over the past couple of years, he has only been doing charcoal sketches.
    "These sketches are now being coloured by someone else and then sold for thousands of rands. For the sake of his art, his good name and the church, this must come to an end."
    Bissonette says Jonker has been getting sketches from Claerhout for years. "No one knows what hold she has on him. Now and then she brings him a bottle of whiskey or a present."
    Apart from the falsified work, sold at about R10 000 a piece, colour photostats of Claerhout's best paintings are being burnt into canvas through a heat process on special paper. They are also being sold as originals.
    Inspector Reggie Kilner, from Westonaria, confirmed that several cases of fraud involving Claerhout artworks are under investigation.
    "We suspect Claerhout artworks are being falsified on a massive scale." Bank statements show Jonker recently started paying back large sums of money to people who complained to her about falsifications.
    Piet Burger, a businessman from Cape Town, received back R56 000 in this way.
    Jonker, who apparently has a predilection for gambling, refuses to discuss the allegations. Last week she said she knew nothing of falsified Claerhouts.
    - Rapport

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Suikerbosrand
    Posts
    143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This is a very sad and very ugly thing that has happened to an artist , Who do you really trust.
    No more handshakes ,that is something of a myth these days :(
    Last edited by admin; 25-04-10 at 19:45. Reason: Removed quote

Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •