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  • *** Shipwreck Coins - Artefacts & Memorabilia ***

    Hello Everyone

    I thought we could start something interesting. I am NO expert on this subject, but I do love shipwreck coins and artefacts. The South African coastline graces some very popular shipwrecks.

    How about the forum members posting stories, articles, pictures etc from their collection or other sources. I am sure there are many avid wreck divers and collectors out there that could make this an interesting post.

    Maybe ADMIN could make it a STICKY.....

    Lets get it rolling Guys....... Geejay..... Pierre Henri.... Herman.... I know you guys love ShipWreck.....

    Cheers
    Last edited by Coinoisseur; 26-05-14, 11:26.
    Anthony G
    The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
    but how much the hobby profits from him.

  • #2
    The following is an article taken from Bloomburg. Its the latest wreck discovered of the Namibian coast in April 2008. De Beers were the company digging when they discovered it. They have now stopped all operations at this site. This is one hell of a find with a load of treasure.



    April 30 (Bloomberg) -- De Beers, the world's biggest undersea diamond miner, said its geologists in Namibia found the wreckage of an ancient sailing ship still laden with treasure, including six bronze cannons, thousands of Spanish and Portuguese gold coins and more than 50 elephant tusks.
    The wreckage was discovered in the area behind a sea wall used to push back the Atlantic Ocean in order to search for diamonds in Namibia's Sperrgebiet or ``Forbidden Zone.''
    ``If the experts' assessments are correct, the shipwreck could date back to the late 1400s or early 1500s, making it a discovery of global significance,'' Namdeb Diamond Corp., a joint venture between De Beers and the Namibian government, said in an e-mailed statement from the capital, Windhoek, today.
    The site yielded a wealth of objects, including several tons of copper, more than 50 elephant tusks, pewter tableware, navigational instruments, weapons and the gold coins, which were minted in the late 1400s and early 1500s, according to the statement.
    The Namibian government will claim ownership of the treasure found, Halifa Mbako, group corporate affairs manager at Namdeb, said in a telephone interview from Windhoek today.
    Namibian Law
    ``By Namibian law, discoveries of this nature belong to the state,'' he said. ``The discovery was found in our mining area, but the treasure belongs to the state.'' The Namibian government is in consultations with the governments of Spain and Portugal to try and identify the ship, which was most likely a trading vessel, given the goods on board, said.
    On April 1, Bob Burrell, the head of Namdeb's Mineral Resource Department, found some rounded copper ingots and the remains of three bronze cannons in the sand.
    ``All mining operations were halted, the site secured and Dr. Dieter Noli, an archaeologist and expert in the Sperrgebiet, was brought into the project and identified the cannons as Spanish breach-loaders of a type popular in the early 1500s,'' Namdeb said.
    The find may be the oldest sub-Saharan shipwreck ever discovered, Namdeb said.
    ``If this proves to be a contemporary of the ships sailed by the likes of Diaz, Da Gama and Columbus, it would be of immense national and international interest and Namibia's most important archaeological find of the century,'' according to the statement.
    Diamonds have been mined along the south-western coast of Namibia and in its coastal waters for the last 100 years. De Beers, the world's largest diamond company, is 45 percent owned by Anglo American Plc, 40 percent held by the Oppenheimer family and 15 percent owned by the government of Botswana.
    Anthony G
    The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
    but how much the hobby profits from him.

    Comment


    • #3
      [/quote]On April 1, bidorbuy Burrell, the head of Namdeb's Mineral Resource Department, found some rounded copper ingots and the remains of three bronze cannons in the sand.[/quote]

      Is the date and first name the key??
      May the ZAR be with you

      Comment


      • #4
        Superb Anthony.

        I were to be involved, But turned it down.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Anthony

          At our previous meeting, in Johannesburg, of the National Numismatic Society (NNS) in the middle of the year, we were all treated to a wonderful discussion by Dr G de Bruin regarding shipwrecked coins.

          This has been a passion of his for years, and it was interesting to all to learn and experience in his enthusiam and knowledge. He began his discussion talking about this find that you mention above and interesting enough was the find on all the old navigational instruments and certain coinage.

          He also had a selection of shipwrecked coins for us to view, and went into a lengthy discussion with wonderful colour photos on the history of shipwrecked coins.

          I will try an obtain an electronic copy for everyone here as i only have a hard copy on me. I will try make it available on the forum including the pictures when i have a chance to get an electronic copy (with admin's permission of course).

          Kind Regards
          Invinci

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Invinci

            I have copy of the talk by Dr Du Bruin. It was sent to me by Brian Hern. I have requested permission to publish this on the forum. Hopefully I will have an answer on Monday.

            I was fascinated by the mans passion for the hobby..... I think it will benefit everyone. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it

            Regards
            Anthony G
            The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
            but how much the hobby profits from him.

            Comment


            • #7
              The wreck of the Merestein:

              Having Dived the Merestein, and salvaged on it..
              One of the most difficult wrecks to work.
              Conditions are not favourable in the best of conditions.

              The Following Coins of mine were sold recently to the

              Nederlandsche Scheepswrakken Museum.





              And one of my Personal Favourites..

              A Rare Portrait Ducat of Philip IIII DATED 1687 ..
              Now sold to a collector in UK.



              I have supplied several Museums worldwide with various AUTHENTIC Shipwreck "Treasures", Coins and Grapeshot, Sounding leads and other articles.
              :D

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bargainhunter01
                On April 1, bidorbuy Burrell, the head of Namdeb's Mineral Resource Department, found some rounded copper ingots and the remains of three bronze cannons in the sand.
                Is the date and first name the key??
                It should read "B o b Durell" as the forum change the name automatically to bid or buy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Askies, my fout!
                  May the ZAR be with you

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Types of coins found on Shipwrecks

                    Hi Anthony,

                    My interest as you know in Numismatics started when my diving friends and I pooled scarce money and imported a metal detector that found coins on old VOC Shipwrecks in the days when there was not so much red tape.

                    The silver coin you show in your posting on the Namibian Shipwreck is a 4 reale from Spain minted at the time of 1480 when Ferdinand and Isabella I reigned and united Spain they sent Christopher Columbus on his way to discover America.It is the first striking of coins by what we now know as Spain. The abbreviated inscrpition reads FERNANDVS ET ELSAB on the Reverse that you show. I recognise it as the same coin that was found amongst others on the Santiago wreck which was wrecked on Bassas da India between Madagascar and Mozambique in 1585. My friends found a nice load of silver coins,emeralds,astrolabe, human remains, several bronze canons,pottery jars and other interesting artifacts that I have photos of.Their story is an epic on its own.

                    This Namibian wreck is thus from a similar time and as wrecks go is much more rare than any of the USA Florida wrecks because trade was still in its infancy then.

                    I hope they find out as much as they can about the wreck and make it available to the world.

                    Regards Geejay

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Georg

                      Thanks for the post. I know your passion for shipwreck coins. I am sure that everyone would love to see some of the pictures or hear some of your experiences or your friends.

                      I have got permission from Dr de Bruin to post his talk on the forum. I am just waiting for the pictures to come......


                      Regards
                      Anthony G
                      The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
                      but how much the hobby profits from him.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The following are coins salvaged off the wrecks "The Meeresteijn" at Saldana Bay 1702 and "The Fame" at Sea Point 1822. Not often do you see these coins in this condition.
                        Last edited by Coinoisseur; 26-05-14, 11:28.
                        Anthony G
                        The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
                        but how much the hobby profits from him.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          *** UPDATE *** UPDATE ***

                          Namibian Portuguese Shipwreck Hailed As One Of The Best

                          ORANJEMUND: A treasure-laden 16th century Portuguese vessel that ran aground off Namibia’s coast was hailed by archaeologists yesterday as providing a rare insight into the heyday of seafaring explorations between Europe and the Orient. This is a cultural treasure of immense importance. Bruno Werz said when offering journalists a first glimpse of the precious find at the excavation site in Namibia’s diamond-rich ‘sperrgebiet’ or no-go zone. The shipwreck, which was discovered by geologists dredging for diamonds in April, is the oldest found in the sub-Saharan Africa. Werz’s team of scientists are from Namibia, the US, Portugal, South Africa and Zimbabwe. It was thought that the ship was linked to Bartholomew Diaz, the first European to round the Cape of Good Hope, in 1488, but some of the ships’ 2000 gold coins were dated October 1525, 25 years after Diaz disappeared. A Portuguese archaeologist described it as the best preserved example of Portuguese seafaring outside Portugal. With diamond mining company Namdeb spending vast amounts to keep the sea at bay while the excavations take place, pressure is on the team to finish the work by early next month.
                          Anthony G
                          The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
                          but how much the hobby profits from him.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            The Fame Shipwreck

                            Hi Anthony

                            Regarding The Fame Shipwreck...

                            There is an Afrikaans book called "Dooie Duikers Deel Nie" loosely translated to "Dead Divers do not Share"

                            A File exists on The Fame that I will share with you if both George and a second party agree to that.

                            If Georg says OK I will get the OK from the second party.

                            Please e-mail me if you are interested. It is a file consisting of ten year of research on The Fame by local diving experts. I nearly died on that site but the rest is an interesting treasure hunt for sure …

                            Pierre-Henri

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Pierre, I was wondering when you were going to post. You have my OK. I am sure that Georg will say OK as well.

                              Many Thanks...... Cant wait....

                              Cheers
                              Anthony G
                              The measure of a numismatist is not how much he profits from the hobby,
                              but how much the hobby profits from him.

                              Comment

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