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  • The New South African Colour Catalogue

    I have just received my new 2010/11 SACC catalogue about which I think there is going to be much debate. The drop in value of modern material I feel has been too steep in some cases and I have only looked at a few. For example, the swa 1974 set of bird control blocks drop from R1,850 to R420. There are many other examples.

    When compared to the big players in the world market such as Gibbons, Michel and Scott it refects the gap in perceptions of our Southern African material compared to the SACC catalogue.

    With South Africans soon to be exposed to the world markets via Ebay/Paypal (with the help of FNB Bank) and 99% of the world using the 3 major catalogues it would seem that the way to go is to list according to these catalogues.

    I would appreciate what others think.

    When looking at the Gibbons Commonwealth catalogue, the Union of South Africa 1927 set of 7 London pictorials, the used set is valued at more than double the unmounted mint set whereas the SACC catalogue values the unmounted mint set at about 60% more than a used set. How does this happen ?

    This shows that each catalogue needs to be looked at carefully as prices have been set using different data - we like to think that demand or supply has determined the price but me thinks that other forces are at play here.

  • #2
    I have listed the new catalogue on BidorBuy.

    Please follow this link:
    Union of South Africa - NEW SA COLOUR CATALOGUE. 2010 edition. Free Postage. for sale in Johannesburg

    Regards

    Jacques
    Philately starts where the catalogue stops.
    Items I have for sale.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by seahorsefanatic View Post
      I have just received my new 2010/11 SACC catalogue about which I think there is going to be much debate. The drop in value of modern material I feel has been too steep in some cases and I have only looked at a few. For example, the swa 1974 set of bird control blocks drop from R1,850 to R420. There are many other examples.

      When compared to the big players in the world market such as Gibbons, Michel and Scott it refects the gap in perceptions of our Southern African material compared to the SACC catalogue.

      With South Africans soon to be exposed to the world markets via Ebay/Paypal (with the help of FNB Bank) and 99% of the world using the 3 major catalogues it would seem that the way to go is to list according to these catalogues.

      I would appreciate what others think.

      When looking at the Gibbons Commonwealth catalogue, the Union of South Africa 1927 set of 7 London pictorials, the used set is valued at more than double the unmounted mint set whereas the SACC catalogue values the unmounted mint set at about 60% more than a used set. How does this happen ?

      This shows that each catalogue needs to be looked at carefully as prices have been set using different data - we like to think that demand or supply has determined the price but me thinks that other forces are at play here.
      So what the few selected stockists do not have in stock & are obviously requiring.........plunges downwards while undoubtedly the very common items which are usually always in stock have gone sky-high.
      At least Michel, Stanley Gibbons etc represent the true value of the Southern African stamps.
      VIEW MY ITEMS!



      “You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.” - Winston Churchill

      Comment


      • #4
        Hello Seahorsefanatic and Voldermort

        I totally agree with everything that both of you have said.

        Fortunately (just for myself), as a dealer dealing mostly in Union and SWA proofs, the catalogue value of my stock is hardly affected.

        While I have not scrutinized the entire 2010 edition, I just cannot comprehend the fall of the London 2/6 shilling and 5 shilling used (down from R4 500-00 to R2 000 and from R7 000-00 to R3 000-00) respectively. In more than 20 years of trading I have seen the 2/6 shilling used (horizontal pair) twice on the market. One I bought and then sold to a collector who is obviously now upset about taking my advice. About 10 years later, Angela Braun had a pair right here on BoB. I will gladly buy the 2/6 at FULL current SACC catalogue value (in fine used condition with certificate).

        On the other end of the market, the pricing of the last 4 years of the Homelands spins my head. Now is the time to buy – even at full catalogue value!

        The next year or so will be interesting! I will buy my heart out.

        Thanks and regards

        Jacques
        Philately starts where the catalogue stops.
        Items I have for sale.

        Comment


        • #5
          After what has already been said, I am of the opinion that the new 2010/11 SACC catalogue gets a big fat thumbs down. What a total dissapointment

          Comment


          • #6
            What is a catalogue?

            Originally posted by seahorsefanatic View Post
            After what has already been said, I am of the opinion that the new 2010/11 SACC catalogue gets a big fat thumbs down. What a total dissapointment
            Catalogues have traditionally been a price list at which the publishing dealer was prepared to sell the said item when in stock. Stamps in plentiful supply usually sold for less, or were discounted by the seller to move excess stock. Scarcer material often commanded a premium. THE MARKET SET THE PRICE!!!!
            This 30th edition is none of the above. It rather seems to be a reflection of the opinion of someone who is not interested in the run of the mill items readily available, and views these with disdain.
            Which dealer is selling at the prices quoted? Exceptions there are, but to increase the auction price for a rarity by a factor in excess of 600%????? To exclude material in most collectors' albums and stockbooks with the dismissive and arrogant comment that this is "clutter" is a demonstration that the editor and his advisors are out of touch with reality. Many collectors used the SACC as checklist, and used examples are in most instances what is affordable. To omit these, and exclude other material which was previously listed does the hobby no favours, and dramatically reduces the usefulness of the publication as a reference work. I guess the potential buyers will decide for themselves whether this is a softcover book deserving of a place on their bookshelf.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have said this many times... the prices in SACC are SG x Exchange Rate at Publication Date. The reason for the current decrease in values, as well as the previous huge increase, should therefore be quite obvious.
              Obligatory link to my listings.

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              • #8
                Is the current exchange rate R3-00 to the British Pound?
                Philately starts where the catalogue stops.
                Items I have for sale.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Depends. Or perhaps the automatic price increase macro got fed incorrect data?
                  Obligatory link to my listings.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another cause for any drop in prices might be "market value." For example, I still use the 2001 Edition and when calculating how much to pay for the items that I collect, I take that price and half it to get the maximum amount to pay. Usually I get the stamps for a quarter of the listed value in that edition.

                    (Important: I do NOT collect the "sought after" items, simply because they are just too expensive. So no comment in that from me.)

                    Seriously though, I agree that a decrease in listed value has a big impact on the "investment" value of stamps. As too many see SACC as the fixer of actual value, instead of a guideline, much money has probably been lost due to the new edition.

                    Speaking of the new edition, are there any new countries listed? Or is it just an update on RSA and Nam. and prices?
                    Obligatory link to my listings.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It looks like the time is coming for someone in the know to publish some sort of unbiased price guide for stamps and coins. With eBay becoming a viable option for selling and buying on international markets very soon, will the SACC and Herns catalogues be a true reflection of real market values? Maybe a few of the stamp clubs and philatelic societies could get together and compile such a "price list". It need not be as fancy as a colour catalogue, just a list, perhaps in a spreadsheet format that could easily be distributed via email.
                      Visit my hive!

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                      • #12
                        BumbleBee, in my opinion price list catalogues are double-edged swords, mixed blessing, and all that.

                        First, it "fixes" the value of an item. Only very few people really adhere to that fixed value, as the market definitely dictates what sells at what price.

                        Second, it creates an artificial value. For example, I recently bought a stamp set valued at over R680 for about R65 on an open auction here on BoB. Now go buy that same set in a shop and you'll pay full catalogue price, plus a handling fee. The questions is therefore, is a specific stamp really worth what the catalogue lists it at? The answer is a resounding no.

                        Third, catalogues are produced by dealers, and dealers want to make money. If a dealer has huge stock of a certain variety, then it will be listed in his/her price catalogue, usually at a premium. If the dealer has no stock of a recently discovered variety, then it usually won't be listed. (This point has recently been proven through the practise of a certain international catalogue to list "unauthorised" stamps at premiums in their catalogues.)

                        In the past one could use a rough formula with age, face value and current value as inputs to determine the rarity of a stamp, and hence its true value. Not anymore.
                        Obligatory link to my listings.

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                        • #13
                          So then its basicaly up to the buyer to decide what he is prepared to pay for an item and how badly he needs it. We are quite new to the stamp collecting scene and are feeling our way around in the dark here. I just picked up a secondhand 2003 catalogue and I find it very helpful in figuring what goes where, but just like the current coin catalogue I guess all the prices are open to interpretation ;)
                          Visit my hive!

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                          • #14
                            Exactly! The catalogue is great for "figuring what goes where," but the prices are, in my opinion, not even guidelines anymore. Homeland & RSA commemorative stamps = 50c or face value each, whichever the greatest.

                            I wish somebody would bring out a new edition of the "Southern African Simplified Stamp Catalogue," as SACC is too complicated for beginners and yet too lean for serious collectors.
                            Obligatory link to my listings.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              OK, so if I am going to sell off any extra stamps that I have, I was thinking of listing them at 2003 catalogue value, would this be the way to go or would you have another suggestion?
                              Visit my hive!

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